Georgia offensive coordinator banned for recruiting violations

Georgia Bulldogs offensive coordinator Mike Bobo. (Paul Abell-US PRESSWIRE)

Georgia Bulldogs offensive coordinator Mike Bobo has been benched in the corner. According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Bobo is suspended from any involvement with off-campus recruiting for 30-days.

Bobo (ok, honestly, you have to laugh the third time you read Bobo in a row) committed a secondary NCAA violation when he escorted a recruit and his mother for free to the NCAA Tennis Championships on the University of Georgia’s campus. The fee for the tournament was $8 per person.

For those out there wondering what a secondary violation means, well, it basically doesn’t mean anything. UGA athletic director Greg McGarity punished Bobo himself. The NCAA doesn’t typically hand out punishments for secondary violations. A violation with no punishment, makes sense right? That’s how “bass ackwards” the NCAA is.

McGarity self-reported the violation to the SEC in a letter:

“A member of the ticket office staff reported this incident to the compliance office,” McGarity wrote. “… The family has been notified and subsequently submitted restitution in the amount of $20.”

“To prevent similar violations of this nature in the future,” McGarity wrote, “the compliance staff met with the coaching staff as well as the ticket office and event management staff regarding the provisions of NCAA Bylaw 13.7.2.4 and reiterated that prospective student-athletes may not receive complimentary admission to NCAA Championships or other postseason contests.”

Yes, McGarity had to write the words “submitted restitution” for $8 tennis tickets. Shame on you Georgia.

Isn’t there bigger fish to fry in this world?

Information from AJC.com was used in this article.

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  • Glen

    The entire NCAA rule book needs to be reviewed, and changes need to be made where warranted. These kinds of rule “infractions” are far more counterproductive than anything else. If the NCAA is serious about how the sports are handled, it’s time to remove the fat from the rule book. There are far too many idiotic rules in there that can, and should be, canned.