Russia plans to kill all stray cats and dogs prior to 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi

Sochi organizing committee president Dmitry Chernyshenko (left) poses with the mascot at a press conference for the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Sochi Park Press Center. (Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports)

Sochi organizing committee president Dmitry Chernyshenko (left) poses with the mascot at a press conference for the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Sochi Park Press Center. (Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports)

Sometimes, Russia’s got to do what Russia’s got to do.

And if that means killing off roughly 2,000 stray cats and dogs in preparation for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, well, so be it. This according to USA Today:

The stray animals will be exterminated to ensure the safety of visitors and improve the city’s image, Sergei Krivonosov, a government official from Sochi, said in an interview with RBC.

“It’s obvious that there should be no animals on the streets. We have responsibilities to the international community,” the lawmaker said. “Killing (the animals) is just a faster way to solve this task.” he said

Krivonosov added that he did not agree with the decision, but shelters would be a strain on city finances. Sochi is budgeting about $54,000 for “work to catch and dispose of” the strays.

Talk about a bizarre animal control plan. Olympics organizers have had years to deal with the issue of stray cats and dogs, but have only decided to figure out a way to deal with it less than year until the start of the Games. Of course there is not enough time to spay and neuter all the strays in the city now, but there probably was years ago, when the city of Sochi first learned it would be hosting the 2014 games.

Obviously, animal rights activists have got their picket signs going.

Olga Noskovets, who organized a rally, said killing animals is an ineffective way to control its population.

“For some time, there will visually be fewer of them, but it won’t solve the problem,” she said. “Moreover, if you kill dogs and cats, the rat population starts to increase rapidly.”

Rats, you say?

Luckily for most of us, we will be following along from America, so this so-called rat problem won’t be a problem at all.

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